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Will Sisi victory give him credibility?

Abdel Fattah El Sisi will be Egypt's next president, but low turnout raises questions about his popularity

Last updated: 29 May 2014 20:29
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With almost all ballots counted, Sisi won more than 90 percent of the votes. But with the low turnout, he may not have the popular mandate to take the tough measures needed to restore healthy economic growth, ease poverty and unemployment, and end costly energy subsidies in Egypt.
 
For many, Sisi has lost the huge momentum he gained when he deposed Mohamed Morsi last year. Even the incredible media campaign in his favour did not manage to rally people into going to the ballot boxes.
 
For his supporters, Sisi is the strong man able to restore stability in Egypt and put an end to the ongoing turmoil. His critics, though, say he will be reproducing the regime of former president Hosni Mubarak, who was overthrown in the 2011 revolution.
 
Now that Sisi will be Egypt's next president, how will he address the country's main problems? Will his victory usher in a new era in this country?
 
Presenter: Adrian Finigan
 
Guests:
 
Omar Ashour: senior lecturer in Middle East Politics at the University of Exeter.
 
Abdel Mawgoud Dardery: He is a former member of the E gyptian Parialiament and member of the Freedom and Justice Party.
 
Tarek Masoud: He is an associate professor of public policy at Harvard Univeristy.
 

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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