[QODLink]
Inside Story

UK bill: Passport to statelessness?

Proposed law would give government more power to strip terror suspects of citizenship.

Last updated: 13 May 2014 20:49
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

The UK has passed a controversial amendment to its Immigration Bill that could be used to strip foreign-born Britons of their citizenship.

It is now one step away from becoming law and would allow the government to revoke the passports of naturalised citizens whose conduct is deemed to be seriously prejudicial to the UK's interests.

Opponents say that two safeguards added to the bill still will not prevent suspects from being made permanently stateless. Legal experts also question whether this could breach international laws.

Lord Taylor of Holbeach, the parliamentary under-secretary of state for the home office, stressed the powers will be used with caution. Speaking in the House of Lords, he said: “The home secretary would reach a decision only after very careful consideration of the facts of an individual case. 

She will reach a decision based on whether she reasonably believes the person has recourse to another nationality under the law of another country.”

So a necessary measure to protect security, or a law that is open to abuse? And do those who are only suspected of crimes risk becoming abandoned and forgotten?

Presenter:  Adrian Finighan

Guests: 

Clare Algar - executive director of Reprieve.

Robin Simcox - a research fellow at the Henry Jackson Society

Saghir Hussain - a lawyer who represents Mahdi Hashi, a Somali-born citizen whose British citizenship was revoked in 2012

 

249

Source:
Al Jazeera
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
Critics claim a vaguely worded secrecy law gives the Japanese government sweeping powers.
A new book looks at Himalayan nation's decades of political change and difficult transition from monarchy to democracy.
The Church of Christ built a $200m megachurch while analysts say members vote in a block.
US state is first to issue comprehensive draft regulations for the online currency, but critics say they are onerous.
Survivors of Shujayea bombardment recount horror tales amid frantic search for lost family members.
join our mailing list