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Fundraising: How should money be spent?

A terminally ill teenager managed to raise more than $3 million for charity.

Last updated: 25 Apr 2014 19:25
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British teenager Stephen Sutton smashed his intial target of raising only a few thousand dollars by generating more than $3m.  Sutton, who has been fighting cancer for months, set up an online campaign in January to raise the funds for charity.
 
A number of celebrities lent their support for Sutton, who, on Tuesday, posted what he thought might be his last message, saying he did not have long to live.
 
The teenager was diagnosed with bowel cancer when he was 15-years-old. He had surgery, but still cancer continued to spread in his body. And after treatment and operations his doctors concluded it was incurable.
 
The money raised so far will go towards his Teenage Cancer Trust, which Stephen says will make a 'transformational difference' for young cancer sufferers in Britain.
 
But, how should the fundraising money be managed and spent? And does it serve its purposes?
 
Presenter: Hazem Sika
 
Guests:
 
Carolan Davidge,  Director of Communications at Cancer Research UK.
 
Ben Russell, Head of Communications at Charities Aid Foundation.
 
Othman Moqbel, CEO of Human Appeal International.
 

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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