[QODLink]
Inside Story

Turkey turns off Twitter

Is the move by Turkey's regulator to block the social media site an isolated move or the start of greater restrictions?

Last updated: 21 Mar 2014 19:06
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

Critics of the Turkish Government have been turning increasingly to social media to voice their opposition.

Now one site - Twitter - has been blocked, after accusations of corruption concerning the Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his inner circle.

Allegations that have been denied.

There have been threats also to ban Facebook and YouTube.

And the government also recently tightened control of the internet - nearly 8,000 websites are jammed.

But Turkish users of Twitter have already found ways around the the ban including the President Abdullah Gul, who tweeted - 'A complete ban of social media platforms cannot be approved.'

So, what does this mean for freedom of expression in Turkey?

Presenter: Mike Hanna

Guests: Asli Tunc, Professor of Communications and Head of Media School at Istanbul Bilgi University.

Yavuz Baydar, Co-founder of the Independent Media Platform 'P24' and writer for the Turkish Newspaper, Today's Zaman.

Ceylan Ozbudak, a Turkish political analyst. Television news presenter and the Executive Director of the non governmental organisation Building Bridges. 

171

Source:
Al Jazeera
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.
Public stripping and assault of woman and rival protests thereafter highlight Kenya's gender-relations divide.
join our mailing list