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Uganda punished over anti-gay law

As the World Bank cuts a loan to Uganda over its new anti-gay law, will this force the government to back down?

Last updated: 28 Feb 2014 18:56
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The World Bank and European countries cut aid and loans to Uganda after its controversial anti-gay bill was passed. But would Ugandans change their mind over homosexuals?

On Monday, President Yoweri Museveni signed into law one of the world's toughest anti-gay legislations.

Now, the World Bank and a number of European countries have stopped aid and loans to Uganda.

The controversial law calls for sentences of life in prison for "repeat homosexuals" and requires people to report on gays.

But it is not the only country to pass such measures recently; Nigeria and Russia have passed similar laws. 

So, why is Uganda being singled out? And what is the reason for the increasing number of anti-gay laws in many parts of the world? 

Presenter: Folly Bah Thibault 

Guests: 

Eric Gitari: Director of National Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission. He is also a human rights lawyer. 

Bisi Alimi: Nigerian Social Commentator and an advocate for gay rights. 

David Bahati: Ugandan Member of Parliament who proposed the anti gay bill.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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