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Inside Story

North Korea: Trumped up tyranny?

As a UN panel accuses Pyongyang of committing crimes against humanity, we ask what the international community will do.

Last updated: 17 Feb 2014 18:04
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According to a year-long investigation by the United Nations, the North Korean government has committed crimes against humanity.

North Korea categorically denies any human rights abuses, saying it is just an excuse cooked up by the UN to justify regime change. But defectors from the country talk of torture, enslavement, sexual violence and severe political repression. 

On Inside Story we ask: What does this all mean for an already isolated country? And what will the international community do with this information?

Presenter: Shihab Rattansi

Guests: Sung-Yoon Lee, an assistant professor of Korean studies at Tufts University

Aidan Foster-Carter, an honorary research fellow of modern Korea studies at the University of Leeds, who writes extensively for the Guardian newspaper on Korea

Matt Dworzanczyk, the director and producer of DPRK: The Land of Whispers - a documentary based on his trip to North Korea

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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