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Inside Story

Afghan elections: Stirring violence and hope

As campaigning begins for a landmark presidential poll, we ask if Afghanistan is ready to go it alone.

Last updated: 03 Feb 2014 09:25
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Campaigning has started for Afghanistan’s presidential election, raising both hope and the spectre of yet more violence.

Even before posters could be put up, two aides of a leading candidate were shot dead.

The upcoming polls are set against a mood of cautious optimism, and continued uncertainty.

The Taliban has rejected the April 5 election. And outgoing President Hamid Karzai has stalled on signing a deal on whether to keep a small force of US troops in Afghanistan beyond 2014.

On Inside Story: Can Afghanistan ensure a safe election and a secure future as foreign troops prepare to leave?

Presenter: Shiulie Ghosh

Guests:

Sediq Seddiqi, a spokesman for the Afghan Ministry of Interior

Peter Middlebrook, the CEO of Geopolicity, and a former adviser to the Afghan government

Ahmad Nader Nadery, the founder and chairman of the Free and Fair Election Forum of Afghanistan

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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