[QODLink]
Inside Story

Afghan elections: Stirring violence and hope

As campaigning begins for a landmark presidential poll, we ask if Afghanistan is ready to go it alone.

Last updated: 03 Feb 2014 09:25
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

Campaigning has started for Afghanistan’s presidential election, raising both hope and the spectre of yet more violence.

Even before posters could be put up, two aides of a leading candidate were shot dead.

The upcoming polls are set against a mood of cautious optimism, and continued uncertainty.

The Taliban has rejected the April 5 election. And outgoing President Hamid Karzai has stalled on signing a deal on whether to keep a small force of US troops in Afghanistan beyond 2014.

On Inside Story: Can Afghanistan ensure a safe election and a secure future as foreign troops prepare to leave?

Presenter: Shiulie Ghosh

Guests:

Sediq Seddiqi, a spokesman for the Afghan Ministry of Interior

Peter Middlebrook, the CEO of Geopolicity, and a former adviser to the Afghan government

Ahmad Nader Nadery, the founder and chairman of the Free and Fair Election Forum of Afghanistan

146

Source:
Al Jazeera
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
Absenteeism among doctors at government hospitals is rife, prompting innovative efforts to ensure they turn up for work.
Marginalised and jobless, desperate young men in Nairobi slums provide fertile ground for al-Shabab.
The Khmer Rouge tribunal is set to hear genocide charges for targeting ethnic Vietnamese and Cham Muslims.
'I'm dying anyway, one piece at a time' said Steve Fobister, who suffers from disabilities caused by mercury poisoning.
The world's newest professional sport comes from an unlikely source: video games.
join our mailing list