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Inside Story
The struggle for Egypt's presidency
As the Muslim Brotherhood calls for a political ban against members of the old regime, who will win the power struggle?
Last Modified: 14 Apr 2012 15:11

"Together against the remnants of the former regime" - that is the demand of Egypt's leading parties, the Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafists, as they called for a million man march in Tahrir Square.

Both do not want members from the Mubarak era to hold any positions of power in post-revolution Egypt. Despite liberals sharing these demands, many, including the April 6 movement and the revolutionary youth coalition, did not take part in Friday's march.

This is not the first time the Muslim Brotherhood has called for people to gather in Tahrir, but this latest demonstration was sparked after the Muslim Brotherhood fielded its candidate, Khairat al-Shater, for the presidency on March 31, although they had promised they would not nominate anyone from within the organisation.

In response, Omar Suleiman, once Hosni Mubarak's vice president in his last days in office, made a last-minute announcement that he would also run for the presidency.

This annoucement was swiftly followed by a law passed in parliament banning top officials who served under Mubarak from becoming president. But this law is yet to be approved by the military council.

So, who will the be the winner of the ongoing power struggle in Egypt? Who stands to gain from the power struggle for the presidency? And will this derail the country's democratic transition?

Inside Story, with presenter Dareen Abughaida, discusses with: Wael Eskandar, a blogger and writer for Al-Ahram online; Nader Omran, a representative and co-founder of the Freedom and Justice Party under the Muslim Brotherhood; and Adel Iskandar, a professor at Georgetown University in the center for contemporary Arab studies, who is also writing a book on the Egyptian revolution.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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