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Inside Story
Egypt: Honeymoon over?
Will Egyptians be able to see the ideals of their revolution become a reality before their country slides into chaos?
Last Modified: 22 Nov 2011 13:59

Protesters have been re-grouping in Cairo's Tahrir Square, with one key demand, the military must hand over power to a civilian government.

On Sunday, events in the iconic square turned ugly as police moved in to disperse the people and break up the camps, firing tear gas and rubber bullets.

Thousands of protesters ran for cover, many were arrested. And despite attempts to empty the square, violent clashes continued, then the people returned.

The brief honeymoon period with the military is well and truly over. But can the people see the ideals of their revolution become reality before the country slides into chaos?

Inside Story presenter Laura Kyle, discusses with guests: Amr Abdel-Moneim, a member of Roxy - a group which supports Egypt's Military Council; Amr Shalakany, an associate professor of civil law at Cairo University; and Heba Morayef, the Cairo representative for Human Rights Watch.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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