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Inside Story
Syria's civil war?
Where is Syria heading, and what can a divided international community do about it?
Last Modified: 19 Nov 2011 13:43

Syria has decided to accept an Arab League mission to observe the implementation of peace proposals aimed at ending violence, hoping to avoid further sanctions.

An audacious attack by the free Syria army, a group of defectors from the national army, on an intelligence base near Damascus earlier this week, raised fears of a long and bloody civil war.

Is the violence in Syria descending into a civil war? The leaders of the Syrian uprising always said they wanted a peaceful protest, but defectors from the Syrian army are fighting back.

Where is Syria heading, and what can a divided international community do about it?

Inside Story discusses with guests: Mustafa el-Labbad, director of Al Sharq Centre for Regional and Strategic Studies; Dimitry Babich, political analyst, Russia Profile Magazine; and Abdulhamit Bilici, a columnist for Today’s Zaman, and general manager for Cihan News Agency.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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