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Inside Story
Is Egypt's constitution being hijacked?
Can the upcoming elections be fair and clean amid increasing political controversy and uncertainty over security?
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2011 12:41

Tension is rising in Egypt as another large demonstration is planned at the iconic Tahrir Square in Cairo, and in other major cities across the country.

The Muslim Brotherhood, youth groups, some opposition parties and political activists will be taking part. The military council claims they are protecting the revolution.

But many others believe the military are now trying to hijack the revolution.

With this controversy, and fears about the security situation, can there still be fair, clean and peaceful elections in just over two weeks?

Inside Story, together with presenter James Bays, discusses with guests: Fouad Abustait, a professor of economics and finance at Helwan University in Cairo; Andrea Teti, a lecturer in international relations at the University of Aberdeen; and Samir Shehata, an assistant professor of Arab Politics at Georgetown University.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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