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Inside Story
Seven billion: time to celebrate or despair?
As the world population reaches the symbolic seven billion mark, we ask if there are enough resources to go around.
Last Modified: 01 Nov 2011 14:14

According to the United Nations Population Fund, the world's population has reached seven billion.

The UN set Monday, October 31, as the 'symbolic' date for the number of people on the planet hitting the seven billion mark.

It also estimates that the world population will reach 9.3 billion by 2050 and exceed 10.1 billion by the end of the century.

It was only 12 years ago that the United Nations named Adnan Mevic, from Bosnia, as the world's six billionth baby.

But is this figure a reason to celebrate or to despair? Can the world's resources handle the growing population? 

Inside Story, with presenter Mike Hanna, discusses with guests: Nirj Deva, the vice-chairman of the European Parliament's Committee on Development; Simon Ross, the chief executive of Population Matters; and Aly Khan Satchu, a financial analyst and CEO of Rich Investments.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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