[QODLink]
Inside Story
Who is to blame for sex tourism?
Prostitution is illegal in the Philippines, but thrives in parts of the capital popular with tourists.
Last Modified: 09 Oct 2011 13:04

Although prostitution is illegal in the Philippines, it thrives in parts of the capital, Manila, that are popular with tourists.

Harry Thomas Jr, the US ambassador to the Philippines, recently sparked controversy when he told a forum of judges and government officials that 40 per cent of male tourists visit the country for the purpose of sex tourism.

He later apologised, expressing regret for his comments and acknowledging that he could not back up the 40 per cent statistic. The presidential office has accepted the apology and says it considers the matter to be closed.

But activists who have been campaigning against the sex tourism industry are disappointed that the wider issue has not been more openly discussed.

Who is to blame for the practice of sex tourism - is it the host countries or the tourists themselves? And what are the limits of ambassadorial speech?

Inside Story, with presenter Mike Hanna, discusses with guests: Amihan Abueva, the regional coordinator for Asia Against Child Trafficking; Mark Thompson, a professor of politics and the director of the Southeast Asia Study Center at City University of Hong Kong; and Aidan McQuade, the director of Anti-Slavery International.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
More than one-quarter of Gaza's population has been displaced, causing a humanitarian crisis.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Muslim charities claim discrimination after major UK banks began closing their accounts.
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Featured
In Brussels, NGO staff are being trained to fill the shortfall of field workers in West Africa.
Lawsuit by 6-year-old girl, locked up for a year, reignites debate over indefinite detention of 'boat people'.
Indonesian and Malaysian authorities are keeping a close eye on local supporters of the hard-line Middle East group.
Citizens of the tiny African nation say they're increasingly anxious of the fallout after alleged coup.
A humanitarian crisis and a budget crisis converge in the heart of the human smuggling corridor in Texas.
join our mailing list