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Inside Story
Sending a signal to Pakistan?
Inside Story examines the impact Afghanistan's strategic partnership deal with India will have on ties with Islamabad.
Last Modified: 05 Oct 2011 10:54

It is a visit aimed at boosting ties with one neighbour that could incense another. Hamid Karzai, the Afghan president, is in India for talks on strengthening security ties with that country.

This comes just days after he publicly questioned Pakistan's commitment to peace in the region, expressing in particular concern about the activities of the ISI, Pakistan's powerful intelligence agency.
 
Just how is this visit viewed in Islamabad? And what does it mean to the relationship between neighbours in an already volatile region?

Inside Story, with presenter Mike Hanna, discusses with Chintamani Mahapatra, a professor of international politics at Jawaharlal Nehru University; Hashem Mohmand, the director of Radio Free Afghanistan; and Omar Waraich, a correspondent for the UK's Independent newspaper.

"I think there is a natural bond between Indians and Afghans for centuries. The relationship has been comprehensive and strategic for a long, long time ... Afghanistan is a struggling democracy, India is a prospering democracy and India is trying to help Afghan nation-building ... I think currently even Pakistan is a nation of democracy and these three democracies are fighting against terrorism, so what is necessary is cooperation between all three countries to combat terrorism. But the fact remains there is a concern that there is state-sponsored terrorism against India and against Afghanistan, so for that India, Afghanistan, and even the US would have to engage Pakistan in a constructive dialogue."

Chintamani Mahapatra

Source:
Al Jazeera
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