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Inside Story
Has Afghanistan lost its chance for peace?
The assassination of the former president casts doubts over the future of reconciliation in a country shattered by war.
Last Modified: 22 Sep 2011 12:43

Hundreds of Afghans are mourning Burhanuddin Rabbani, the former president who was killed in his Kabul home on Tuesday.

The Taliban refused to comment on Wednesday on the assassination, denying any claims of responsibility.

Rabbani, who spearheaded efforts for peace talks despite fierce resistance on many fronts, was himself a controversial figure in Afghanistan's bloody civil war.

His death has cast doubts over the future of reconciliation in a country shattered by decades of chaos.
 
Who was behind the assassination and does it scupper any chance for negotiations? What does this mean for the future of Afghanistan?
 
Inside Story, with presenter Laura Kyle, discusses with Ahmed Shah Ahmedzai, the former Afghan prime minister; retired Major-General Jamshed Ayaz Khan, a defence and security analyst for the region; and Ahmad Wali Masoud, a former Afghan ambassador to the UK who currently heads the Masoud Foundation.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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