On Tuesday, an unprecedented legal case began in Italy. Seven scientists stand accused for failing to predict the 2009 earthquake in L'Aquila which devastated the central Italian region.  

The men are accused of manslaughter. But the reason why is not straightforward.  

Prosecutors accuse the scientists of providing "inexact, incomplete and contradictory information", so lulling the public into a false sense of security.

It was at 3.32 am on April 6, 2009, when a 6.3-magnitude earthquake hit central Italy. More than 300 people were killed and 50,000 lost their homes. 

So, is this a trial against science? Or is it a distraction from the real reason why so many people lost their lives? 

Inside Story, with presenter Laura Kyle, discusses with guests: Giampaolo Giuliani, an independent researcher in seismology; Rafaela Calandra, a journalist with Italy's Radio 24; and Kristian Lauta, a researcher in disaster law at the University of Copenhagen.

Source: Al Jazeera