[QODLink]
Inside Story
US troops in Iraq: To stay or go?
Inside Story asks if the full withdrawal of US troops scheduled to take place by the end of the year will go ahead.
Last Modified: 03 Aug 2011 12:54

Eight years after the US-led invasion to topple Saddam Hussein, Iraq remains the most volatile of places. 

And now another issue is back, the US presence in Iraq. Around 44,000 US troops remain in Iraq, down from about 170,000 at the peak of the war, with a full withdrawal scheduled by the end of the year.

But even that is up for debate. One of the things both Iraqi and US leaders are now looking for is some sort of final decision on whether the remaining US troops should stay or go.

Will American troops stay longer than planned? Can the politicians work towards the greater good? What is it that prevents Iraq from moving forward? 

Inside Story, with presenter Kamahl Santamaria, discusses with guests: Saad al-Muttalibi, a former political advisor to the Iraqi government; Scott Lucas, a professor of American Studies at the University of Birmingham; and Anas Altikriti, the CEO of the Cordoba Foundation - a group seeking to promote dialogue between the Muslim world and the west.

This episode of Inside Story aired on Tuesday, August 2, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.