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Inside Story
Japan: the challenges ahead
The new Japanese prime minister must confront the post-tsunami recovery, a nuclear crisis and a faltering economy.
Last Modified: 30 Aug 2011 10:20

Japan's parliament has elected Yoshihiko Noda, a former finance minister, as the country's sixth prime minister in five years.

He assumed the position a day after being chosen to head the ruling Democratic Party of Japan.

He takes the place of the increasingly unpopular leader Naoto Kan, who, along with his cabinet, resigned on Tuesday after nearly 15 months in office.

Noda must now address the country's post-tsunami recovery and nuclear crisis, while dealing with a sluggish economy.

Can the new prime minister handle the challenges ahead and will he bring more stability to the country's top job?

Inside Story, with presenter Sami Zeidan, discusses with guests: Seijiro Takeshita, the director of Mizuho International, and Sean Curtin, a professor of East Asia studies at the University of Westminster.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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