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Inside Story
Who will lead Libya?
As Muammar Gaddafi's regime crumbles, Inside Story looks at the challenges awaiting those who will replace him.
Last Modified: 25 Aug 2011 10:41

The end of Muammar Gaddafi's regime is already a foregone conclusion, and the focus has now shifted to the future of Libya.

The rebel formed National Transitional Council (NTC) is set to take the lead in Libya. It has already been recognised as the legitimate government of Libya by a number of countries, including Britain and the US. But running a country that has effectively been in the hands of one man for the last 42 years will not be an easy task and the NTC are likely to face many challenges. 

Just what does the immediate future hold for the new leaders of Libya? And can they secure a country wracked by months of conflict? 
 
Inside Story, with presenter Hazem Sika, discusses with guests: Suliman Gajam, a Libyan political activist and academic; Rami Khouri, the director of the Issam Fares Institute at the American University in Beirut; and Omar Ashour, a writer at the Center for Arab and Islamic studies at University of Exeter.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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