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Inside Story
DSK: The case and the chaos
The case against Dominique Strauss-Kahn appears to be crumbling, so what does the future hold for the former IMF boss?
Last Modified: 02 Jul 2011 11:10



The sexual assault case against the former International Monetary Fund (IMF) chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn is on the verge of collapse. That is according to the New York Times, which says two law enforcement officials have discovered "major holes in the credibility" of Strauss-Kahn's accuser. 

Prosecutors say, since making the allegations, the Guinean-born hotel maid has repeatedly lied and that she may also be linked to people involved in illegal drugs and money laundering. Strauss-Kahn faces seven felony charges including attempted rape, if convicted he could face 25 years in prison.

Since the start, it has all been about an accusation of rape. But media reports suggest prosecutors are now working with three possible scenarios that could each destroy the case against Strauss-Kahn.

So what does the future hold for the former IMF boss? Have his political ambitions been undone by over-zealous officials and media or has he been the architect of his own demise?

Inside Story, with presenter Kamahl Santamaria, discusses with Christian Malard, a political correspondent with France 3 TV; Brian Cathcart, a professor of journalism at Kingston University and a media columnist at the New Statesman; and Paul Tweed, a media lawyer and a senior partner at Johnsons Solicitors. 

This episode of Inside Story aired from Friday, July 1, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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