[QODLink]
Inside Story
Russia and the flight of capital
Are investors running scared as uncertainty reigns over Russia's political future?
Last Modified: 17 Jul 2011 10:11

Dmitry Medvedev, the Russian president, has called on business leaders this week to decide whether they support him for a second term or want Vladimir Putin, the current prime minister and former president, back in the Kremlin.

With eight months to go until a presidential election is held, Russia still does not know who will stand for the country's highest office.

So far both Medvedev and Putin are seen as contenders. But neither has made any official announcement, and the uncertainty may be affecting the country's economy.

Are investors running scared over the country's political future?

Inside Story, with presenter Hazem Sika, discusses with guests: Alexander Nekrassov, a former Kremlin advisor; James Moore Junior, a former US assistant secretary of commerce for trade development; and Dimitry Babich, a political analyst with Russia Profile magazine.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Saturday, July 16, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.