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Inside Story
FIA: Putting money before morality?
Motorsports world governing body votes to hold Bahrain Grand Prix despite concerns from human rights groups.
Last Modified: 05 Jun 2011 11:24

The motorsports world governing body, the FIA, has unanimously voted to return the Bahrain Grand Prix to the 2011 Formula One racing calendar.

The race, which is due to be held on October 30, was originally called off in February because of pro-democracy protests.

The FIA, says its decision "reflects the spirit of reconciliation in Bahrain".

But it has angered human rights bodies and campaigners. Amnesty International says that despite the lifting of emergency laws that have been in place since March, serious human rights violations continue to be committed in the kingdom with security measures still in place to stop large gatherings.

So, will the event bring unity to the kingdom, as the organisers claim? Or are they simply putting money before morality?

Inside Story discuss with guests: Mansour al-Areedh, the chairman of the Gulf Council for Foreign Relations; Maryam al-Khawaja from the Bahrain Centre for Human Rights; and Mohamed Sheta, the editor of Auto Arabia Magazine.

This episode of Inside Story aired on Saturday, June 4, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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