[QODLink]
Inside Story
The plight of domestic workers abroad
Indonesia is stopping their nationals going to Saudi Arabia to work as maids after one woman was beheaded last week.
Last Modified: 29 Jun 2011 11:32



Indonesia is stopping all maids from going to work in Saudi Arabia after the beheading of a maid last week for murdering her allegedly abusive employer.

The execution of 54-year-old Ruhati Binti Sapahi caused public outrage in Indonesia, prompting the government to call for the ban.

Saudi Arabia did not inform the Indonesian ambassador that the execution was going to take place but apologised afterwards for the "mistake".

Twenty-two other Indonesian workers are also on death row in Saudi Arabia.  

Indonesia has 1.5 million workers in Saudi Arabia alone, most of them women. In total Indonesia has 6 million workers abroad, again mainly women. Last year they remitted $7bn to their families in Indonesia.
 
But what does it take to protect their rights? And who is to blame for their suffering?

Inside Story, with presenter Folly Bah Thibault, discusses with Simel Esim, a senior regional technical specialist on gender equality and women worker's rights for the International Labour Organization, and Christoph Wilcke, a senior researcher at Human Rights Watch, specialising in Saudi Arabia and Jordan. 

This episode of Inside Story aired from June 28, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.