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Inside Story
Diabetes: No longer the preserve of the rich?
A new study has revealed that diabetes is far more widespread than previously thought.
Last Modified: 27 Jun 2011 14:20



A new study has revealed that diabetes is far more widespread than previously thought. Nearly 350 million adults around the world have the disease, doubling the rate of 30 years ago.

Researchers from Imperial College London and Harvard University analysed data from more than 2.5 million adults across the world. They found that the number of people with Type 2 diabetes, which is linked to obesity and lifestyle, is no longer limited to rich countries.

It is now a global problem, and fast becoming the biggest cost for many health care systems.

Why is diabetes on the rise? Can it be avoided?
 
Inside Story, with presenter Shiulie Ghosh, discusses with Dr Michael Hall, the former chairman and current vice-president of Diabetes UK; Lorenzo Piemonte, of the International Diabetes Federation in Rome and a diabetes patient; and Dr Khalid bin Jabor Al Thani, the former under-secretary of Qatar's ministry of health in Doha.

This episode of Inside Story aired from June 26, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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