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Inside Story
Is Facebook's popularity waning in the West?
The social networking site is growing worldwide, but the number of people using it is falling in Western countries.
Last Modified: 15 Jun 2011 14:12



The number of people using Facebook has dropped in the UK for the second month in a row, mirroring similar falls in the US, Canada and Norway - giving the first signs that the social network's popularity may be waning in the west.

But the website continues to grow worldwide, hitting an all-time high of 687 million users. That is according to data from the tracking company Inside Facebook, which uses Facebook's own advertising tools to determine the number of people using the site every month. 
 
Growth has slowed, however, having risen by 13.9 million accounts in April and then just 11.8 million in May. Typically in the past year it has grown by 20 million a month. That slowdown could thwart founder Mark Zuckerberg's ambition to reach one billion users worldwide, despite his prediction last June that: "It is almost a guarantee that it will happen."
 
Just why has the use of Facebook peaked this way in Western countries while it seems to continue to rise around the world? 
 
Inside Story with presenter Teymoor Nabili discusses with guests: Charlotte McEleny, a senior reporter for the New Media Age publication; Kevin Anderson, a technology journalist; and Barry Fox, a contributing editor for Consumer Electronics Daily.

This episode of Inside Story aired on Tuesday, June 14, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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