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Inside Story
Does Turkey need a new constitution?
Turkey's vote is less about who wins and more about if they will secure the majority needed to amend the constitution.
Last Modified: 11 Jun 2011 11:29

On Sunday, Turkey will go to the polls to elect a new parliament and government. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's Justice and Development Party, or AKP, is expected to win and continue its rule for a third consecutive term - a first in Turkey's history.

But this election is less about who is going to win and more about whether the party that does win, will secure a big enough majority to amend the constitution. The AKP needs between 330 to 367 seats in the National Assembly. If the party does secure the super majority, it will not need the support of any other party to approve the new constitution.

But why does Turkey need a new constitution? And can the governing party obtain the majority required to allow it to unilaterally write it?

Inside Story discusses with guests: Andrew Finkel, a journalist who has reported from Turkey for the past two decades; Fadi Harkura, a Turkey specialist and associate fellow at London's Chatham House; and Yusuf Kanli, a columnist for Hurriyet Daily News.

This episode of Inside Story aired on Friday, June 10, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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