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Inside Story
Time ticking for NATO in Libya
How much longer can the international organisation continue its airstrikes in Libya?
Last Modified: 18 May 2011 12:43



After three months of conflict and popular protest in Libya, international pressure on Muammar Gaddafi, the Libyan leader, is mounting.    

Luis Moreno Ocampo, the ICC's chief proescutor, has requested arrest warrants be issued for Colonel Gaddafi, one of his sons and Libya's spy chief. They are wanted for the killing of thousands of Libyans.

On Tuesday, Tripoli was again the target of more NATO airstrikes. But how long can NATO keep up the bombardment, with a limited mandate to operate in, and Gaddafi showing no sign of stepping down? 

Inside Story, with presenter Kamahl Santamaria, discusses with Tarik Youssef, a senior research fellow at the Dubai School of Government; David Metham, the UK director for Human Rights Watch; and Saad Djebbar, an international lawyer, and the deputy director for the Centre of North African studies at Cambridge University.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Tuesday, May 17, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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