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Inside Story
Seeking a diplomatic solution
Diplomatic efforts to end the Libya crisis reach a stalemate as Gaddafi sends his envoy to Europe.
Last Modified: 05 Apr 2011 14:53

After more than a month of fighting, Muammar Gaddafi, the Libyan leader, has reverted to diplomatic efforts in a bid to end the crisis.

On Sunday, Abdel Ati al-Obeidi, Libya's deputy foreign minister, landed in Athens, carrying a message from Gaddafi to the Greek prime minister. This was followed by a trip to Turkey and then Malta.

The Greek foreign minister said his country wants to reinforce the demands of the UN resolution, while Franco Frattini, Italy's foreign minister, dismissed al-Obeidi's message from Gaddafi as "not credible" and reiterated that Gaddafi had to leave power. At the same time, Italy recognised the Libyan Opposition National Council as the only legitimate authority in the country.

But the Libyan opposition is still refusing any kind of settlement, saying they will accept a UN-demanded ceasefire only if Gaddafi pulls his forces out from all Libyan cities. 

Inside Story, with presenter Dareen Abughaida, discusses with guests: Ashur Shamis, a Libyan journalist and writer; Dimitris Papadimitriou, a reader in European Politics at the University of Manchester; and Claire Spencer, the head of the Middle East and North Africa Programme at Chatham House.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Monday, April 4, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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