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Inside Story
Prosecuting Mubarak
Will putting the former president on trial for corruption appease those concerned about a counter-revolution?
Last Modified: 12 Apr 2011 09:13

The Egyptian public prosecutor has issued an order to summon Hosni Mubarak, the former president of Egypt, and his two sons, Alaa and Gamal, for questioning over allegations of corruption.

Just hours earlier Mubarak had made his first public statement since his dramatic departure from office. He denied being involved in corruption and denied having financial assets in foreign countries.

For his part the public prosecutor said Mubarak''s speech will not have any impact on the legal measures against him and his family.

All this follows a crackdown on protestors in Tahrir Square on Friday and Saturday, in which two people were killed and 70 injured.

So, would a trial appease those worried about a counter-revolution in Egypt? Or might it further strain relations between the army and the people?

Inside Story presenter Nick Clark discusses with guests: Mustapha al-Sayyid, a professor of political science at Cairo University; Sharif Abdel Kouddous, a correspondent for Democracy Now; and Wael Eskander, a columnist for Al Ahram Online.

This episode of Inside Story aired on Monday, April 11, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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