[QODLink]
Inside Story
Plots and propaganda in Cote d'Ivoire
Laurent Gbagbo is using state-run media to portray support for his rival as evidence of a plot against him.
Last Modified: 11 Apr 2011 09:38

Alain Le Roy, Cote d'Ivore's UN peacekeeping chief, has told the UN Security Council that forces loyal to incumbent leader Laurent Gbagbo have gained ground in Abidjan, and are in full control of some important parts of the city.

Le Roy also said that Gbagbo's forces - battling those of his rival Alassane Outtara - had used a lull in peace talks as a trick to reinforce their position in the capital.

This week Gbagbo had agreed to negotiate without preconditions, following talks with heads of state from the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and the African Union (AU).  

But he still has not agreed to hand over power to Ouattara - the country's internationally recognised president. 

ECOWAS has threatened to oust Gbagbo by force. But he is using state-run media to portray regional and international support for Ouattara as evidence of a plot against him and his government

Inside Story discusses with guests: Alexandre Vautravers, a professor of International Relations at the Webster University in Geneva; Gamal Nkrumah, the deputy editor of Al Ahram Weekly; and Renaud Girard, the chief foreign correspondent of the French Newspaper, Le Figaro.

This episode of Inside Story aired on Saturday, April 9, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.