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Inside Story
Unrest in Jordan
What does the future hold for the Jordanian government and the king who appointed it?
Last Modified: 28 Mar 2011 09:42

On the 24th of this month, Jordanians demanding democratic reforms established a tent camp in Amman's Jamal Abdel Nasser roundabout.

Naming their movement after the date, March 24, the protesters said the sit-in would continue until their call for political change was met.

But within 24 hours clashes were underway at the camp as riot police and civilians identified as government supporters attacked the demonstrators - killing at least two and injuring dozens more.

One of the demonstrators' demands is that the prime minister, Marouf al-Bakhit, resign, but he has refused to do so and has claimed that the protests are being orchestrated by the Muslim Brotherhood and its Jordanian offshoot the Islamic Action Front.

On this episode, we ask what the future holds for the Jordanian government and the king who appointed it.

Joining us to discuss this are: Sabri Samirah, a political analyst and leading member of the Muslim Brotherhood in Jordan; Adnan Hayajneh, a professor of political science at Hashemite University; and Feras Mahadin, a member of the March 24 movement.

This episode of Inside Story aired on Saturday, March 26, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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