[QODLink]
Inside Story
Military defections shake Yemeni government
Three army commanders have thrown their weight behind the protesters who are demanding the president step down.
Last Modified: 22 Mar 2011 12:30

Three army commanders, including a top general, have defected saying they are now with the protesters and calling for the end of Ali Abdullah Saleh''s 30-year rule.
 
The move came as thousands took to the streets of Sanaa on Friday to mourn the deaths of protesters killed by sniper fire.
 
The most senior to defect is Major General Ali Mohsen al-Ahmar, a long-time confidant of Saleh, along with Bridadiers Ali Mohsin Saleh and Hameed Al-Qushaibi. 
 
Also in recent days, the most prominent tribal council has thrown its lot in with the protest movement and a number of newly appointed cabinet ministers have resigned.
 
But will these mass defections be enough to force a peaceful handover of power? Or in a country still recovering from years of civil war is this divide a spark for another one?

Inside Story presenter Mike Hanna is joined by guests: Hassan Nafaa, a professor of political science at Cairo University; Khaled Fahmy, a professor of history at the American University of Cairo; and Mark Perry, a foreign affairs analyst.

This episode of Inside Story aired on Monday, March 21, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.