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Inside Story
True democracy for Egypt?
Millions of Egyptians cast their votes in the country's first fully-free ballot over constitutional amendments.
Last Modified: 20 Mar 2011 13:20

Millions of Egyptians have cast their votes in the country's first fully-free ballot, saying a simple 'yes' or 'no' to a number of constitutional amendments.

Some 40 million people are eligible to vote - and the vast majority have done so, relishing their newly-won freedom.
 
The arguments for and against amending the constitution have been intense, the debate spilling over into the streets, cafes and homes of a people long denied the right of meaningful political discussion.
 
The result will determine whether or not parliamentary and presidential elections will take place this year.
 
But on this day it is ultimately not just about what is decided. The real victory has already been won by those who fought so hard for the right to make the decision.

Will the changes introduce a true democracy? Or could they lead to yet another autocratic system in which little changes but the faces of those who rule?

Inside Story, with presenter Mike Hanna, discusses with guests: Issam el-Aryan, the spokesman of the Muslim Brotherhood; Rabab al-Mahdi, a political activist; and Amr Shalakany, a professor of law at Cairo University.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Saturday, March 19, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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