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Inside Story
Who is winning the Libyan conflict?
Both rebels and forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi have claimed victory in fights over key towns.
Last Modified: 15 Mar 2011 15:09 GMT

In recent days, rebel groups have been hit hard by pro-Gaddafi forces. The situation on the ground remains uncertain, but latest reports suggest those loyal to Muammar Gaddafi, the Libyan leader, have recaptured Azzawiya - 30km  to the west of the capital Tripoli. The frontline is now moving towards the east.

And while the international community debates whether or not to impose a no-fly zone over Libya, very little of the onslaught is coming from the air. Tanks, artillery, helicopters and ships at sea are spear-heading the Gaddafi offensive.

And while at one stage the rebel forces said they were confident of taking Tripoli, they are now struggling to even hold on to the cities they took in other parts of Libya.

Just who is winning this conflict? And are hopes that the Libyan leader would be ousted proving premature?

Inside Story, with presenter Mike Hanna, discusses with guests: Mohamed Adulmalek, the chairman of Libya Watch, which is a human rights organisation; Faraj Najam, a Libyan historian and the author of Tribes, Islam, and state in Libya; and Anas el-Gomati, a political analyst.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Monday, March 14, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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