[QODLink]
Inside Story
Who is winning the Libyan conflict?
Both rebels and forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi have claimed victory in fights over key towns.
Last Modified: 15 Mar 2011 15:09 GMT

In recent days, rebel groups have been hit hard by pro-Gaddafi forces. The situation on the ground remains uncertain, but latest reports suggest those loyal to Muammar Gaddafi, the Libyan leader, have recaptured Azzawiya - 30km  to the west of the capital Tripoli. The frontline is now moving towards the east.

And while the international community debates whether or not to impose a no-fly zone over Libya, very little of the onslaught is coming from the air. Tanks, artillery, helicopters and ships at sea are spear-heading the Gaddafi offensive.

And while at one stage the rebel forces said they were confident of taking Tripoli, they are now struggling to even hold on to the cities they took in other parts of Libya.

Just who is winning this conflict? And are hopes that the Libyan leader would be ousted proving premature?

Inside Story, with presenter Mike Hanna, discusses with guests: Mohamed Adulmalek, the chairman of Libya Watch, which is a human rights organisation; Faraj Najam, a Libyan historian and the author of Tribes, Islam, and state in Libya; and Anas el-Gomati, a political analyst.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Monday, March 14, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.