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Inside Story
Gaddafi's inner circle
As some of those close to the Libyan leader continue to defect, how important is his remaining inner circle?
Last Modified: 27 Feb 2011 13:06 GMT

Speaking from Tripoli's old city ramparts, Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi promised to open weapons depots to arm all Libyan people and tribes to defend the nation against what he calls "saboteurs" - those who have taken control of large parts of the country.

As Gaddafi stubbornly refuses to relent and violently cracks down on the thousands who protest his rule, he is banking on the loyalty of his close circle. Among them, his sons and key security officials.

But as some of those close to him continue to defect - how important is his remaining inner circle to his survival? Who exactly are they - and will they stick around?

Inside Story, with presenter Imran Garda, discusses with Nouri al-Masmari, the former head of Gaddafi's Protocol; Mahmuod el-Shama, a Libyan writer and journalist; and John Hamilton, the director of Cross Border Information and a Libya analyst.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Saturday, February 26, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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