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Inside Story
Change or status quo?
In Egypt, the fight for meaningful change is far from over.
Last Modified: 17 Feb 2011 12:33 GMT

The uprising in Egypt has been described as a revolution by many, including the army, but is it really?

Was it a coincidence that Hosni Mubarak did not announce that he was stepping down Thursday last week, as many had expected him to, and then on the following day his vice-president told the world that Mubarak had decided to hand over his power - not to the head of the people's assembly, as stipulated in the constitution, but to the military? 
 
Is the military leadership playing an honest transitional role? Is it really trying to meet the demands of those who rose up against the old regime, or is it in fact working for only limited changes in the country so it can remain in control?

Joining us to discuss these issues are: Amr Hamzawy, the director of research of the Carnegie Middle East Centrein Beirut; Shaheer George, a pro-democracy activist who took part in the protests in Tahrir Square; and Anoush Ehteshami, a professor of international relations at Durham University.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Wednesday, February 16, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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