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Inside Story
Owning Egypt's revolution
Can Egypt's young people come together or will they be swept aside in the march towards change?
Last Modified: 14 Feb 2011 10:02 GMT

After almost three weeks of dramatic protest, Hosni Mubarak finally stepped down as president of Egypt.

As the Egyptian army struggles to clear Tahrir Square of protestors, opposition groups are still trying to find a united voice.
 
Cracks are already showing in the youth movement, who say they are the rightful owners of the revolution.

Keen to preserve their achievements, the Coalition of the Youth of the Revolution, which includes members of the April 6 Youth Movement, the Muslim Brotherhood Youth and young supporters of Mohamed ElBaradei, plan to form their own opposition party.

During the protests, they were successful in mobilising the Egyptian people with the help of social media. But as the roadmap for the future is planned, will their voices be heard in the clamour for real change? 

Inside Story, with presenter Darren Jordon, discusses with our guests in Cairo: Mohamad Waked, a member of the political opposition group Keefaya (Enough); Gigi Ibrahim, a political activist; and Alaa Abdel Fattah, an activist and blogger.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Sunday, February 13, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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