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Inside Story
A new dawn for Egypt
Who will be tasked with rebuilding the nation and what challenges will the people of Egypt face?
Last Modified: 13 Feb 2011 11:29 GMT

Saturday in Cairo saw people back in Tahrir Square - still celebrating Hosni Mubarak's Friday departure. After 30 years in power, it took only 18 days of nationwide demonstrations to force him out.

The military has stepped in saying that the current cabinet will stay in place as a caretaker government before democratic elections.

As the nation celebrates, the first steps on a long journey of reform are being taken.

With plenty of challenges along the way, and no clear leadership ready to step up, what is in store for the people of Egypt?

Joining the programme to discuss these issues are Ezzedine Choukri Fishere, a professor of international politics at the American University in Cairo; Wael Khalil, a blogger and activist; and Samir Shehata, an assistant professor of Arab politics at Georgetown University's Center for Contemporary Arab Studies.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Saturday, February 12, 2011. 

Source:
Al Jazeera
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