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Inside Story
Iran's nuclear setback
We investigate the computer virus thought to have set Iran's nuclear programme back by years.
Last Modified: 22 Jan 2011 08:18 GMT

Iran's nuclear programme is under the spotlight again this week; diplomats from the five permanent members of the UN security council plus Germany are in Istanbul for talks with Saeed Jalili, Iran's chief nuclear negotiator.

Iran is under pressure to prove that its nuclear activities are peaceful. The US has warned of more sanctions if the government does not cooperate.

But behind the scenes, US and Israeli officials are surprisingly upbeat about the issue. That is because it is widely believed that Iran's nuclear programme has been put back by several years after a computer virus damaged a number of its centrifuges.

But who is behind the Stuxnet worm?

Inside Story, with presenter Shiulie Gosh, discusses with guests: Scott Steinberg, the CEO and head of technology for consulting firm Tech Savvy; Fred Cohen, the CEO of Fred Cohen and Associates, a company specialising in enterprise information protection; and Kamran Bokhari, the Middle East and Asia regional director for global intelligence company STRATFOR.

This episode of Inside Story aired on Friday, January 21, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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