[QODLink]
Inside Story
North Africa's anger
Why are the EU and the US largely ignoring the unfolding tragedy in Algeria and Tunisia?
Last Modified: 11 Jan 2011 13:37 GMT

Violent clashes continue across countries in North Africa as fury mounts against inflation and living conditions.

At least four people were shot dead and six others seriously wounded late Saturday when security forces clashed with protesters in central Tunisia.

In Algeria, three people were reported dead with more than 400 injured.

The death toll is increasing and the governments are struggling to find ways to calm tensions. Armies have been sent to control the streets, and live ammunition have been used against protesters.

Why are the EU and US watching the unfolding tragedy in North Africa with little or no reaction?

Joining us on Inside Story is Saad Djebbar, an Algerian lawyer and analyst on North African affairs; Hugh Roberts, also an analyst on North Africa and author of The Battlefield: Algeria 1988 - 2002; and Samuel Laufer, the chair of Youth Abroad in the Union for a Popular Movement.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Sunday, January 9, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
Absenteeism among doctors at government hospitals is rife, prompting innovative efforts to ensure they turn up for work.
Marginalised and jobless, desperate young men in Nairobi slums provide fertile ground for al-Shabab.
The Khmer Rouge tribunal is set to hear genocide charges for targeting ethnic Vietnamese and Cham Muslims.
'I'm dying anyway, one piece at a time' said Steve Fobister, who suffers from disabilities caused by mercury poisoning.
The world's newest professional sport comes from an unlikely source: video games.
join our mailing list