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Inside Story
Cote d'Ivoire's power struggle
Can Thabo Mbeki prevent civil war erupting after rival candidates both claimed victory in the presidential elections?
Last Modified: 06 Dec 2010 14:14 GMT

Thabo Mbeki, the former South African president, has arrived in Abidjan to try to resolve the tense stand-off following presidential elections in Cote d'Ivoire.

Incumbent Laurent Gbagbo and his main rival Allasane Outtara are both claiming victory, and both have taken oaths of office, as the political crisis spirals out of control.
 
Gbagbo is backed by the highest legal authority in the land - but the electoral commission says Outtara won most votes, a position backed by the UN, the US, the EU and the African Union.

The EU has sent Mbeki to mediate a way out of the political crisis in this African country.

So, will both men agree to a peaceful resolution? Or will the country slide back into civil unrest?

Inside Story, with presenter Shiulie Gosh, discusses with Yao Gnamiea, the special advisor to Laurent Gbagbo on diplomatic affairs; Marie-Roger Biloa, the editor of Africa International, and Sam Kona, an independent analyst from Peace Caravan.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Sunday, December 5, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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