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Inside Story
Women in the Egyptian parliament
For the first time, women will make up at least 12 per cent of the country's parliament thanks to a new quota system.
Last Modified: 30 Nov 2010 11:55 GMT

Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian president, has been in power for almost 30 years and is likely to soon be celebrating an election victory for his National Democratic Party (NDP). Initial results show that the main opposition party has lost all of its 88 seats in parliament. Egypt's opposition parties are crying foul and claiming that the election was rigged.

But for the first time, women will make up at least 12 per cent of parliament thanks to a new quota system.

Can female voices answer the widespread calls for real democratic change in Egypt? 

Joining us to discuss this are our guests: Nawal Saadawi, an Egyptian writer and commentator; Maged Reda Botros, a member of the NDP and a member of the policies committee; and Mona El-Kouedi, a political analyst specialising in Middle Eastern politics at Kings College.

This episode of Inside Story aired on Monday, November 29, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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