[QODLink]
Inside Story
Osama bin Laden's solution
The al-Qaeda leader has called for the creation of a relief body to deal with disasters in Muslim countries.
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2010 12:52 GMT

Osama bin Laden, al-Qaeda's leader, has released a second audio recording in just 24 hours. But this time it is different.
 
He is urging Muslims to tackle famine, flood relief and clean water - stark problems plaguing parts of the Islamic world.
 
He is also accusing Muslim nations, and Arab leaders in particular, of not doing enough to support relief efforts in Pakistan.
 
He says the UN secretary general seems to have done more and has called for the creation of a relief body to deal with disasters in Muslim nations.

Is it a genuine call or an attempt to gain support among frustrated Pakistanis?

Joining the programme are Hamid Mir, a political commentator and security expert, Phil Rees, an expert on Islamic movements and the author of Dining with Terrorists, and Abdul Bari Atwan, the editor-in-chief of Al-Quds Al-Arabi newspaper.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Sunday, October 3, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
'I'm dying anyway, one piece at a time' said Steve Fobister, who suffers from disabilities caused by mercury poisoning.
The world's newest professional sport comes from an unlikely source: video games.
The group's takeover of farms in Qaraqosh, 30km from Mosul, has caused fear among residents, and a jump in food prices.
Protests and online activism in recent months have brought a resurgence of ethnic Oromo nationalism in Ethiopia.
Chemotherapy is big business, but some US doctors say it could be overused and are pushing for cheaper and better care.
join our mailing list