[QODLink]
Inside Story
Global corruption
We discuss why corruption is becoming a serious worldwide problem and what can be done to fight it.
Last Modified: 27 Oct 2010 12:21 GMT

Lack of transparency, accountability and good governance, remain main reasons behind the epidemic levels of corruption worldwide.

Almost two thirds of world nations suffer from significant levels of corruption.

Transparency International says the financial crisis and climate change fuelled corruption in some nations, although war-torn countries remain at the bottom of the list.

The findings indicate a serious worldwide corruption problem and highlight the need to make more efforts to towards strong governance structures across the globe.

Is corruption a local issue or has it become a global disease? And can there be a global mechanism to fight it?

Joining the programme are Robin Hodess, the director of policy and research at Transparency International, Sam Vaknin, a fomer senior business correspondent for United Press International, and was an economic adviser to the Macedonian government, and David Cole, the managing director of the think tank - the Atlantic Council UK.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Tuesday, October 26, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.