[QODLink]
Inside Story
How to save the UK's economy
The UK finance minister has announced the biggest spending cuts in decades.
Last Modified: 21 Oct 2010 12:49 GMT

George Osborne, the UK's finance minister, has announced the biggest spending cuts in decade, saying these measures are the only way to bring the country from the brink.

The cuts, which will shape the course of the economy over the next four years, are the deepest since the early 1920s and follow the longest and deepest slump in output since World War Two. 

Economists are split between those who say the drastic action is needed and those who argue it will tip the UK back into recession.

So, will these cuts save the UK's economy? And were there any political motives?

Inside Story, with presenter Hoda Abdelhamid, discusses with Vanessa Rossi, a senior research fellow of the International Economics Programme at Chatham House, Iain Dale, a political commentator and author, and Mehdi Hasan, The New Statesman's senior political editor.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Wednesday, October 20, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.