[QODLink]
Inside Story
A change of heart?
Hariri says he was wrong for accusing Syria of being involved in his father's death, but what is behind this shift?
Last Modified: 08 Sep 2010 14:41 GMT

 

In a stunning change of heart Saad al-Hariri, the Lebanese prime minister, has said he was wrong to accuse Syria of murdering his father, Rafiq al-Hariri, the late Lebanese prime minister.

It was Lebanese anger towards Syria after the bombing in which Rafiq was killed in 2005 that led to the Cedar Revolution and the end of Syria's military presence in Lebanon.

But recently relations between the two countries have improved and now al-Hariri has dramatically changed track.

The about-turn will come as a relief to international players, including the US and Saudi Arabia, who have been working to bring Syria in from the cold.

But why now? Who is behind it? And where does it leave the investigation into Rafiq al-Hariri's death?

Inside Story, with presenter Shiulie Gosh, discusses with Saleh Machnouk, a writer and political analyst, George Jabbour, a former advisor to Hafez al-Assad, the late Syrian president, and Lamis Andoni, a Middle East analyst who has written extensively on the politics surrounding the investigation into the murder of the Lebanese prime minister.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Tuesday, September 7.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
Afghan militias have accumulated a lengthy record of human-rights abuses, including murders and rapes.
Growing poverty is strengthening a trend among UK Muslims to fund charitable work closer to home.
A groundbreaking study from Johns Hopkins University shows that for big segments of the US population it is.
Critics claim a vaguely worded secrecy law gives the Japanese government sweeping powers.
A new book looks at Himalayan nation's decades of political change and difficult transition from monarchy to democracy.
join our mailing list