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Inside Story
Obama's role in the Middle East
With the first direct talks between the Israeli and Palestinian leaders in two years, can the US help resolve the issue?
Last Modified: 04 Sep 2010 14:09 GMT

Barack Obama, the US president, tells the Israelis and Palestinians to seize the moment as they convene in Washington to tackling the Middle East head on.

Compared to his predecessor, Obama started fairly early to resolve the crisis in the Middle East. He has shown the political intent but is he willing to shoulder the political costs spelling out a vision acceptable to both sides. 

Can the US help resolve all final status issues, and is it taking a more involved approach this time to ensure higher chances for success?

Joining the programme are Anshel Pfeffer, the correspondent for Israeli and International politics at the Israeli daily newspaper Haaretz, David Mack, the deputy assistant secretary of state for Near East Affairs from 1990 to 1993, and US ambassador to the UAE from 1986 to 1989, and Abdel Bari Atwan, the editor-in-chief of Al-Quds Al-Arabi newspaper.

This episode of Inside Story airs from Thursday, September 2, at 1730GMT, with repeats at 2230GMT, and the next day at 0430GMT and 1030GMT.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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