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Inside Story
A Journey
Inside Story discusses the impact of Tony Blair's memoirs two years after he left office.
Last Modified: 02 Sep 2010 11:09 GMT

"On the basis of what we do know now, I still believe that leaving Saddam in power was a bigger risk to our security than removing him and that, terrible though the aftermath was, the reality of Saddam and his sons in charge of Iraq would at least arguably be much worse," Tony Blair, the former British prime minister, writes in his book released on Wednesday. 

In addition to Iraq war, which remains Blair's most divisive legacy, he also talks about his his controversial ties with the US. Domestically, Blair said he found his rival and successor Gordon Brown very difficult and maddening.
 
Inside Story, with presenter Hazem Sika, discusses the impact Blair's book, A Journey, could have two years after he left office.
 
Joining the programme are Mehdi Hassan, the New Statesman's senior political editor, Nile Gardiner, the director of the Margaret Thatcher Centre for Freedom at the Heritage Foundation, and Rami Khourim, the director of the Issam Fares Institute at the American University of Beirut.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Wednesday, September 1, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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