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Inside Story
Blue Line tensions
Lebanese and Israeli troops engaged in a deadly clash along the tense border.
Last Modified: 05 Aug 2010 10:01 GMT

Trouble is brewing at the Israel-Lebanon border. The two sides exchanged fire on Tuesday. At least five people were killed and several others wounded.

The Lebanese army has confirmed that it opened fire on Israeli forces for reportedly crossing the border fence and cutting trees in its territory.

However, Israel says that it was only clearing obstacles on its side of the border, and that it had co-ordinated with the United Nations peacekeeping force in Southern Lebanon (Unifil).

The UN has confirmed both claims and has increased its patrols of the Blue Line, the UN-administered border between Israel and Lebanon.

While Israel's security cabinet met in Jerusalem on Wednesday, more troops were re-deployed to the border to continue with the maintenance activity.

Lebanon has said its army is on high alert and will retaliate in event of new Israeli aggression.

So, in this tense situation in a highly volatile region, could a new war be averted?
 
Inside Story, with presenter Hazem Sika, discusses with Hisham Jaber, a retired Lebanese army general, Shmuel Sandler, a professor of Political Science at Bar Ilan University, and Simon Tisdall, an assistant-editor of the Guardian newspaper.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Wednesday, August 4, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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