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South Africa strikes
More than a million public sector workers are protesting against their bad pay.
Last Modified: 29 Aug 2010 13:48 GMT

South Africa is on strike as more than a million public sector workers are, yet again, set to hit the streets. Workers belonging to the country's main union federation, COSATU, say they are not happy with their pay and the seven per cent increase offered by the government is simply not enough.
 
This time, the Unions vowed that they won't stop their strike until their demands are met. Many are now warning of the negative effects of the repeated strikes on South Africa's economy.

But what is exactly causing the workers's anger? And would the government listen to their demands?

Inside Story, with presenter Hazem Sika, discusses with guests Sakhela Buhlungu, a professor of sociology at the University of Johannesburg, and Author of the new book: A Paradox of Victory: COSATU and the Democratic Transformation in South Africa; Christopher Klopper, the chairman of the Independent Labour Caucas, an Alliance of 11 Trade Unions; and Aly Khan Satchu, financial analyst and CEO of Rich Management.

Inside Story aired from Wednesday, August 18, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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